“perspectivas frente al colapso civilizatorio”, jornadas en badajoz, 9 y 10 de marzo

Jornadas sobre ecologismo, antidesarrollismo y ecofeminismo con Renaud Marcovaldo, Jose Manuel Naredo, Yayo Herrero y Jorge Riechmann.

9 y 10 de marzo en el Centro social Algarroba negra. Programa e inscripción (gratuita) en la web de Ecologistas en Acción

un texto clave de donella h. meadows: “bailar con sistemas”

¿Qué tiene que ver la Dinámica de Sistemas, clave para entender nuestro rumbo de colapso ecosocial, con el baile? Donella Meadows, autora principal del clásico informe The Limits to Growth (1972), sabía la respuesta:

“bailar con sistemas” en revista 15/15/15

 

conferencia de jocelyn joe-starck (daqualama), 13 de febrero en cantoblanco

Conferencia de Jocelyn Joe-Starck (Daqualama): Evolving Today’s Climate Change Approach with Kwaday Dän K’e (Long Ago People’s Way). Una voz indígena canadiense.

Miércoles 13 de febrero, 12 a 14 h.

Sala de conferencias de FyL UAM, Cantoblanco (Madrid).

Su cuenta de Twitter


The world is looking to Indigenous people for guidance in how to address climate change. In my community we are putting great effort into ensuring the wellness of our people and that is founded in our reconnection to our land, culture and language – in turn we are seeking to reclaim our inherent roles as stewards and caretakers of the land.  The Indigenous method is to take care of the land as a whole. Where instead of monitoring siloed variables and making assumptions of safeguarding based on understanding only a few of the environmental factors, we strive to keep the land intact and therefore all our relatives of the forest and water have a home to thrive in.

This approach can be extended to Earth. And in our current approach to climate change we are again making assumptions by trying to confront only a few factors. Yes, the climate is being exasperated by fossil fuel use and it is leading to catastrophic events. But I suggest that along with concentrating on emission targets, we put great effort into shifting our lifestyles away from actions that directly or indirectly inflict harm on Earth. And my offer is that this can be achieved by focusing on human wellness and providing a means for people to live fuller lives – promote integrity, allow fulfillment and do it as one together. If advanced, we can work towards strong communities, committed to each other and our shared Earth. We would reduce our dependency on consumerism that is one of the greatest drivers of Earth hurt and we would work towards a greater sense of prosperity that is rooted in a better tomorrow for our children to come. Our Earth must be healthy from the sky to the core – and that can only happen if we commit to a return to harmony with Earth and with each other. That is the Indigenous way.

This is the root of my presentation. I will present some of today’s challenges and thread them with stories from my home in an effort to suggest that some of my people’s way of promoting prosperity may be applicable to all nations around the world seeking a better tomorrow for our children.

Jocelyn Joe-Strack
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Biography:
Jocelyn Joe-Strack, Daqualama, is a member of the Wolf Clan of northwestern Canada’s Champagne and Aishihik First Nation. Jocelyn is an Indigenous scientist, philosopher and entrepreneur who strives to evolve tomorrow’s policies by blending yesterday’s ancestral lessons with today’s systematic knowledge. She uses her experience as a trained microbiologist, hydrologist and policy analyst along with her cultural foundations to explore resilient approaches to challenges such as climate change, societal wellbeing, and valuation in economics and policy. With her business, Subarctic Research & Strategy, she is currently leading development of a progressive Land Use Plan for her First Nation’s Traditional Territory – which will contribute to the Yukon-wide regional land planning process. She is concurrently applying this experience to work towards a PhD in Sustainability & Environment with the University of Saskatchewan. Daqualama was born and currently lives in Whitehorse, Yukon Territory with her husband and two young children.


Y también en la Casa de América: